Improve Your Eyesight With Juicing – A Holistic Approach

Our modern lifestyle forces us to spend a large part of a day in front of various types of electronic screens. This is a very recent development in human history and there is ample evidence that our eyes are having difficulty adapting to the daily demands we put them under.

Our eyesight is vital for a healthy, independent and fulfilling life. Yet, more and more people experience different eyesight problems, including cataracts, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy (common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness).

"By 2020, 3 million Americans are expected to be affected by age-related macular degeneration, which is the biggest cause of blindness!"

​Isn't this news frightening?

So the next question that should come in our mind is:

What can we do to protect our eyes?

While taking regular breaks from computer monitors while we are working and reducing the amount of time we spend staring at the illuminated screens can be our first steps to start with. Apart from that plant based balanced diet, and in particular juicing, may be able to help heal your eyes.

Find out about foods that nourish your eyes and get a juicing recipe that will help you to protect your eyes and keep your eyesight in top condition.

It’s never too late to start looking after your precious eyes.

Eating the right foods is definitely an important step in the right direction and an even more convenient way is to juice certain foods to naturally protect and even improve your eyesight.

The Importance of Xanthophylls:

Juicing fresh fruit and vegetables provides a wealth of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants for better eyesight. Pro-vitamin A carotenoids like alpha and beta-carotene are very important for your eyes, as is antioxidant vitamin C and minerals like zinc.

While deficiencies in these nutrients do happen, and many of us could use more of them for optimal eye health, a far more likely issue with vision problems is a lack of xanthophylls.

Xanthophylls are class of carotenoid antioxidants, most commonly found in fruits and vegetables with yellow, orange and red colors, or in leafy greens where the green chlorophyll dominates. Lutein and zeaxanthin are the best known xanthophylls and the most important for your eyes.

Zeaxanthin and lutein are highly concentrated in the macula area of your eye that is responsible for perceiving fine details on a page or screen. They actually give your macula its distinctive yellow color and are vital for protecting it from UV and high-intensity blue light.

Blue light is a difficult band of the color spectrum for your eyes to deal with and regular overexposure is often associated with serious eye conditions like cataracts and age-related macula degeneration (ARMD).

Studies suggest that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin can reduce your risk of developing ARMD. Given that this eye disease is the biggest cause of blindness in elderly people in the USA and is expected to affect around 3 million Americans by 2020, these antioxidants are worth getting more of if you value your vision as you get older.

Even for people already with macular degeneration, increasing xanthophyll intake may help repair the damage. This research found that supplementing with lutein led to measurable improvements in vision and macula pigment density. The scientists said, 'lutein may play an important role in eye health as a useful bioactive agent in reducing the risk of ARMD'.

Another study found that lutein supplementation for people who worked in front of computer screens all day improves visual function, contrast sensitivity and 'lutein may have beneficial effects on the visual performance'. Lutein and zeaxanthin are also believed to help protect your eyes from other eye diseases like cataracts and glaucoma as well.*highlight*)

So how do you increase your intake of lutein and the even harder to get zeaxanthin? If you're already noticing eye problems like regular eyestrain and difficulty concentrating on the screen, a high zeaxanthin and lutein supplement derived from natural sources like marigolds can often help.

From a dietary perspective there are certain fruits and vegetables that contain lutein and zeaxanthin and are very beneficial to juice if you value your vision.

Here's five of the best.


5 High Lutein and Zeaxanthin Fruits and Vegetables for Juicing :


1. Kale

Dark green leafy vegetables are often considered a good source of lutein and kale is one of the most concentrated. Extremely high in vitamins, minerals and many other antioxidants to protect your eyes from free radical damage, raw kale is an excellent vegetable to juice for better vision and better health in general.

2. Orange Bell Peppers

These might seem like an unusual vegetable to juice, but they're actually quite tasty. Bell peppers, and particularly the orange colored ones, are a great source of zeaxanthin for juicing. Red and yellow peppers should also be good if you can't find orange, but green bell peppers aren’t considered useful for xanthophylls.


3. Celery

The stalks and particularly the leaves of celery are a good source of lutein for your eyes. Celery's cleansing and detoxifying properties also benefit your kidneys. Kidney health is closely related to eye health in Chinese traditional medicine so definitely worth including in your juice.

4. Beets with the Beet Greens

Deep red beet juice is full of nutrients that benefit your liver, another vital organ associated with eye health. Many important bodily function suffer when your liver is under strain so beets are a great vegetable to add to many different juicing recipes.

Interestingly, beet greens and stalks are considered an excellent source of lutein and zeaxanthin so are well worth including in juices for improving your vision.

5. Kiwifruit

Recent testing has shown kiwifruit to be surprisingly high in lutein for better eyes. Given that they are also a great source of vitamin C which is needed for protecting your vision, kiwifruit is definitely deserves its place in the recipe ahead. It helps that kiwi juice tastes great as well.


Key Vitamins and Nutrients that Help your Eyes Stay Healthy:


Vitamin A:


Vitamin A deficiency can cause night vision problems and increase your risk of macular degeneration and cataracts. It can also cause severe dry eyes, which can lead to eye infections and vision loss.


Research suggests vitamin A also may lower your risk of cataracts and macular degeneration later in life. It also may slow vision loss in people with an eye condition called retinitis pigmentosa


Vitamin A also plays a vital role in bone growth and helps you fight off pink eye symptoms and other infections by keeping your immune system strong. And it is essential for healthy skin.


This essential vitamin is also important for the heart, kidneys, lungs, bones and general immunity.


The best dietary sources include beef or chicken liver, cod liver oil, milk and eggs. Indirectly, your body can also obtain it from colorful vegetables and fruits (pro-vitamin A carotenoids – see below).


With vitamin A, you need to be careful not to consume it over-keenly, as excessive amounts may be harmful. If you ingest over 2,800 micrograms (9,333 IU) per day, you can develop vitamin A toxicity, which manifests as headaches, dizziness, joint pain and skin changes. The recommended daily intake is 600 micrograms of vitamin A obtained from a varied diet of both plant and animal foods.


Also, be careful taking supplements if you use oral acne medications that contain isotretinoin (one example is Accutane). These medications can contain high levels of vitamin A, increasing your risk of a toxicity reaction.


Pro-vitamin A Carotenoids:


Other important nutrients for your eyes and vision are the yellow, orange and red pigments in fruits and vegetables that are called carotenoids. There are hundreds of carotenoids, but the most common ones found in North American diets are alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene.


Carotenoids are also called phytonutrients, a term that describes plant-derived nutrients confirmed as important to human health.


Pro-vitamin A carotenoids. Alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin are called pro-vitamin A carotenoids because your body converts them to vitamin A during digestion.


Currently no recommended dietary allowance exists for pro-vitamin A carotenoids, but the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association recommend that everyone eat a variety of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables daily.


Good sources of carotenoids are leafy greens and orange, yellow and red fruits and vegetables (kale, spinach, leaf lettuce, carrots, bell peppers, tomatoes, tomato juice, sweet potatoes, broccoli, squash, watermelon, pink grapefruit, apricots).


Lutein and Zeaxanthin:


A study that was conducted in 2008 indicated that the people who consumed lutein and zeaxanthin are 23 percent less prone to cataracts than the people who do not have those nutrients in their diets.


These two potent antioxidants are important to your eyes because they help protect your retina from damage caused by the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays and high-energy visible (HEV) light. Prolonged exposure to UV and HEV rays may damage the retina and increase your risk of developing macular degeneration.


Some research suggests lutein and zeaxanthin also may reduce your risk of cataracts later in life.


Lutein and zeaxanthin are naturally occurring plant pigments in dark leafy greens, including kale, spinach, romaine lettuce and green leaf lettuce. They are also in a variety of other vegetables, including broccoli, squash, orange bell peppers, beetroot with the beet greens, kiwifruit, carrots and tomatoes.


These fruits and veges can all be used to make delicious, vision promoting juices. Eggs are also a good dietary source.

There is no RDA for lutein and zeaxanthin. But some researchers suggest you need at least six to ten milligrams (mg) of lutein daily for good eye health.


Lycopene:


Another important carotenoid for good vision, lycopene is the pigment that gives tomatoes their red color. The redder the tomato, the more lycopene is present. Besides tomatoes and tomato juice, other sources of lycopene include watermelon, pink grapefruit, apricots and blood oranges.


Research suggests lycopene, like lutein and zeaxanthin, may reduce your risk of macular degeneration and cataracts later in life. Lycopene also appears to lower the risk for a number of cancers, including lung cancer, prostate cancer in men and cervical cancer in women.


Currently, there is no RDA for lycopene, but to achieve the health benefits of this and other phytonutrients, the National Academy of Science and other health-related organizations recommend that you include plenty of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables in your daily diet.

Vitamin E:


Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant vitamin, helps your body produce red blood cells. It also may help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and prevent certain types of cancer. Studies also suggest vitamin E may help maintain good eyesight throughout your life by reducing your risk of cataracts and macular degeneration.


Sunflower seeds and almonds are excellent sources of vitamin E. Other vitamin E-rich foods include hazelnuts, peanut butter, spinach, avocados, olive oil and whole grains.


The daily RDA for vitamin E is 15 mg (22.5 IU) for teens and adults.


Vitamin C:


Vitamin C (also called ascorbic acid), a water-soluble vitamin and powerful antioxidant, is abundant in many fruits and vegetables. Top sources include oranges and orange juice, red and green bell peppers, grapefruit, strawberries, broccoli and kale.


Vitamin C is mainly known for its immunity boosting effect. It’s also a stress fighter, which means that if your stress levels are high, you should consume more of it.


Vitamin C helps protect you from heart disease and may help prevent a variety of cancers. It also strengthens your immune system, helps repair and regenerate tissues and may shorten colds or reduce their symptoms.


Vitamin C is also very important to your eyes. Studies suggest supplemental vitamin C may reduce your risk of cataracts and macular degeneration later in life.


The RDA for teens (ages 14 to 18) is 75 mg for boys and 65 mg for girls. After age 18, the RDAs increase to 90 mg for males and 75 mg for females.


If you smoke, quit. In addition to numerous adverse health effects, there is a strong link between smoking and sight-threatening eye diseases.


If you continue to smoke, at least increase your daily vitamin c intake. Some experts recommend a minimum of 250 mg each day, while others say as much as 1,000 mg are needed daily to combat the oxidative effects of air pollution and cigarette smoke.


Bioflavonoids:


Bioflavonoids (also called flavonoids) are a large family of natural pigments found in many of the same fruits and vegetables that are good sources of vitamin C.


A diet rich in bioflavonoids appears to lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, cataracts and macular degeneration.


Until recently, the health benefits of bioflavonoids were considered to be due to their role as antioxidants. But recent research suggests the primary benefit of bioflavonoids may be their ability to reduce inflammation, maintain healthy blood vessels and help your body get rid of potentially toxic and cancer-causing chemicals.


There is no RDA for bioflavonoids, but most fruits and vegetables that are good sources of vitamin C also supply your body the bioflavonoids it needs. Berries, grapes, soy foods, dark chocolate and hot peppers are good food sources of specific types of flavonoids.


A good way to make sure you get enough of these important nutrients is to drink a cup of flavonoid-rich green tea every day, rather than a sugary soda!

Nutrients

Sources

  Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)

Vitamin A

Beef liver, chicken liver, cod liver oil, milk, eggs

600 micrograms

Carotenoids

Kale, spinach, leaf lettuce, carrots, bell peppers, tomatoes, tomato juice, sweet potatoes, broccoli, squash, watermelon, pink grapefruit, apricots

No RDA established

Vitamin C

Oranges, orange juice, red and green bell peppers, grapefruit, strawberries, broccoli, kale

The RDA for teens (ages 14 to 18) is 75 mg for boys and 65 mg for girls. After age 18, the RDAs increase to 90 mg for males and 75 mg for females

Bioflavonoids

Berries, grapes, apples, oranges, grapefruit, yellow onions, soy foods, legumes, teas, dark chocolate

No RDA established

Vitamin E

Sunflower seeds and almonds are excellent sources of vitamin E. Other vitamin E-rich foods include hazelnuts, peanut butter, spinach, avocados, olive oil and whole grains.

The daily RDA for vitamin E is 15 mg (22.5 IU) for teens and adults

ProVitamin A Carotenoids

Kale, spinach, leaf lettuce, carrots, bell peppers, tomatoes, tomato juice, sweet potatoes, broccoli, squash, watermelon, pink grapefruit, apricots

No RDA established

Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Kale, spinach, romaine lettuce and green leaf lettuce. broccoli, squash, orange bell peppers, beetroot with the beet greens, kiwifruit, carrots, tomatoes and eggs.

There is no RDA for lutein and zeaxanthin. But some researchers suggest you need at least six to ten milligrams (mg) of lutein daily for good eye health.

Lycopene

Tomato, watermelon,pink grapefruit, apricot & blood orange

No RDA established

Watch this video to know what Drew is suggesting for improving eyesight with his signature juice recipe !

15 Amazing Juicing Recipes For Healthy Eyes:

Juicing is a great way of consuming fruits and vegetables. Juicing machines take out the fiber content of fruits and vegetables. This means that you absorb the nutrients more effectively and quickly. Regular juicing is a great way to improve your eyesight. However, if you prefer to consume it as a smoothie and enjoy the extra fiber it provides, use a blender and add liquid to your desired consistency.

You can start your day with the following juice, which includes fruits and vegetables rich in eyesight-promoting substances.

1

Vision Opener:

Ingredients:

  • 2 stalks of celery (contain Pro-vitamin A carotenoids)
  • 1 carrot (contains Pro-vitamin A carotenoids)
  • 1 orange bell pepper (contains Vitamin C)
  • 2 oranges (contain Vitamin C)
  • 1 beet with greens (contain Lutein and zeaxanthin)

You can also add berries (see more information below on berries and how they can improve your vision).

Preparation:

  • Wash your produce. If non-organic, you can use apple cider vinegar to remove the toxic chemicals.
  • Peel the oranges, but you can leave the seeds inside the bell pepper.
  • Feed the fruits and veges through the juicer.
  • Stir well and serve with ice.
  • You can add a dash of raw honey and coconut oil for sweetness and extra health effect.
2

Vision Enhancer:

This juicing recipe is designed specifically to provide a high level of lutein and zeaxanthin as well as other nutrients for healthy eyes. It's good to drink in the morning if you have a long day in front of the computer screen ahead.


​While the kale, orange bell pepper and celery aren’t exactly sweet, they’re far from unpleasant and the natural sugars of the beet and kiwifruit soften out the flavor. If you want a little extra sweetness than add an extra kiwifruit or a carrot, also good for your eyes with their pro-vitamin A beta-carotene.


Ingredients


  • 2 branches of kale.
  • 1 orange Bell pepper.
  • 2 stalks of celery.
  • 1 beet with the greens.
  • 3 kiwifruit.

Preparation

  • Don't worry about deseeding the bell pepper or skinning the kiwifruit. Just wash your produce well in warm water and a splash of apple cider vinegar to clean it and minimize sprays if it’s not organic.
  • Once it's ready feed it steadily through the juicing shute, finishing with the celery to push as much of the juice through your juicer as possible.
  • Stir up the multicolored juice so it’s well blended and pour it into glasses with a couple of ice cubes. Drink immediately for the most antioxidants and eye benefits.
3

Better Eye Sight Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • Pineapple
  • Carrot
  • Lemon
  • Dandelion Greens
  • Orange Bell pepper
  • Apple

Preparation:

  • Wash these ingredients thoroughly and de-seed the bell pepper.
  • Juice and mix it together.
4

Heart Beet:

Ingredients:

    • Apple - 1 medium (3" dia)
    • Beet Root - 1 beet (3" dia)
    • Carrots - 12 medium
    • Lemon - 1/2 fruit (2-3/8" dia)
    • Oranges (peeled) - 2 fruit (2-5/8" dia)

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

5

The Eye Opener

Ingredients:

  • Apples - 2 medium (3" dia) 364g
  • Carrots - 14 medium 854g
  • Oranges (peeled) - 2 small (2-3/8" dia) 192g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

6

Don't Forget Your Roots:

Ingredients:

  • Beet Root - 1 beet (3" dia) 175g
  • Carrots - 10 medium 610g
  • Sweet Potato - 1 sweetpotato, 5" long 130g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

7

Peach Medley:

Ingredients:

    • Apples - 2 large (3-1/4" dia) 446g
    • Carrots - 10 medium 610g
    • Lemon (outer skin cut off) - 1/2 fruit (2-3/8" dia) 42g
    • Orange - 1 large (3-1/16" dia) 184g
    • Peaches - 2 large (2-3/4" dia) 350g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

8

Lemon Essence:

Ingredients:

    • Apple - 1 medium (3" dia) 182g
    • Carrots - 8 medium 488g
    • Ginger Root - 1 thumb (1" dia) 24g
    • Lemon - 1 fruit (2-3/8" dia) 84g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

9

Veggie Blueberry:

Ingredients:

    • Apple (granny smith) - 1 medium (3" dia) 182g
    • Blueberry - 1 cup 148g
    • Broccoli - 1 stalk 151g
    • Carrots - 6 large (7-1/4" to 8-/1/2" long) 432g
    • Tomato - 1 medium whole (2-3/5" dia) 123g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

10

Appleberry Lush:

  • Apple - 1 medium (3" dia) 182g
  • Carrots - 7 medium 427g
  • Strawberry (heaping) - 1 cup, whole 144g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

11

Bunny Brew:

Ingredients:

  • Carrots - 7 medium 427g
  • Lemon - 1/2 fruit (2-1/8" dia) 29g
  • Peppermint - 7 leaves 0.35g
  • Pineapple - 1/2 fruit 452.5g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

12

Remembering Your ABCs:

A drink that's wildly popular in Singapore because of it's great health benefits.

Apples + Beets + Carrots

Ingredients:

  • Apples - 2 medium (3" dia) 364g
  • Beet Root - 1 beet (2" dia) 82g
  • Carrots - 6 medium 366g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

13

Sweet Satin:

Ingredients:

  • Apples - 2 medium (3" dia) 364g
  • Carrots - 6 medium 366g
  • Pineapple (heaping) - 2 cup, chunks 330g
  • Sweet Potato - 1 sweetpotato, 5" long 130g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

14

Red Tangy Spice :

Just like the name says, this is a tasty, spicy, red veggie juice with a bit of a lime tang.

Ingredients:

  • Beet Root - 1 beet (3" dia) 175g
  • Carrots - 5 large (7-1/4" to 8-/1/2" long) 360g
  • Celery - 2 stalk, large (11"-12" long) 128g
  • Ginger Root - 1 thumb (1" dia) 24g
  • Jalapeno - 1 pepper 14g
  • Lime - 1/2 fruit (2" dia) 33.5g
  • Spinach - 2 cup 60g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.

15

Rainbow Blitz:

Ingredients:

  • Apple - 1 medium (3" dia) 182g
  • Carrots - 5 medium 305g
  • Cucumber - 1 cucumber (8-1/4") 301g
  • Ginger Root - 1 thumb (1" dia) 24g
  • Lemon - 1 fruit (2-1/8" dia) 58g
  • Pear - 1 medium 178g
  • Spinach - 2 handful 50g

Preparation:

  • Process all ingredients in a juicer, shake or stir and serve.


Some Fruit-Herb-Veg Combination for treating Specific Eye Conditions:

Best's Disease:

First described by Adams in 1883, but named for Dr. Friedrich Best, who presented a detailed pedigree of the disease in 1905, Vitelliform dystrophy, or Best disease, is a hereditary retinal dystrophy involving the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and leads to a characteristic bilateral yellow “egg-yolk” appearance of the macula. This disease tends to present itself in childhood or early adulthood and usually portends a good visual prognosis.

Foods That Can Help:

You can try these green combo for this problem: Ginger, leeks, garlic, beets, parsley, carrots, cabbage, celery, apples, spinach, raspberries, grapes, lemon, wheat grasses chlorophyll, (not too much fruit).

The Lens: Cataracts, Conjunctivitis:

Cataracts:

A cataract is a cloudiness that occurs in the lens of the eye. The lens is made mostly of water and protein that is arranged to let light through. Sometimes the protein clumps, blocking light and making the lens appear cloudy.

Symptoms
A person with cataracts may encounter faded colors, problems with light (such as halos, or headlights that seem too bright), poor night vision, double vision, or multiple vision.

Conjunctivitis:

Whereas Conjunctivitis, commonly called pink eye, is a redness of the eye. It is often accompanied by a discharge (clear, yellow, or white) and itching in the eye.

Causes
Pink eye is most often a viral infection, but it may also be caused by bacteria or an allergic reaction. Viral pink eye is highly contagious.

Prevention and Treatment

To avoid spreading conjunctivitis, wash your hands often, do not touch the infected area with your hands, do not share wash cloths or towels, and avoid using makeup which may become contaminated.

A child with pink eye should be kept from school for a few days. Sometimes an eye doctor will need to prescribe antibiotic eye drops and ointments to clear up conjunctivitis.

Foods That Can Help:

Study shows that regular juicing/ eating carrot, celery, spinach, endive, blueberry, parsley, apple can ward off the chances of cataracts and is also good for your eye’s health.

Diabetic Retinopathy:

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition associated with diabetes. High levels of blood sugar may damage tiny blood vessels in your eye. New vessels may form to replace the damaged vessels. The new vessels can burst, resulting in blurred vision or even blindness.
Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include:

  • "Floaters” – small specks that pass across your field of vision, made up of cells floating in the transparent gel of your eyeball
  • Difficulty reading or seeing things close-up
  • Sudden loss of vision
  • Flashes
  • Blurred or darkened vision

Risk Factors and Treatment
If you have diabetes, make sure you control your blood sugar level. This will reduce your risk of getting diabetic retinopathy.

Foods That Can Help:

Ginger, asparagus, garlic, leeks, jerusalem artichokes, spinach, parsley, beets, pumpkin, celery, carrots, cabbage, raspberries chlorophyll.

Notes:

We have to avoid sweet fruits to be included for juicing because fruits which are loaded with fructose can increase our blood sugar level.

Eye Floaters:

Floaters are small moving spots that appear in your field of vision. They may be especially noticeable when you look at something bright, such as white paper or a blue sky.

Eye floaters can be annoying, but they generally don't interfere with your sight.

Occasionally a particularly large eye floater may cast a subtle shadow over your vision. But this tends to occur only in certain types of light.

Most of the time people learn to live with eye floaters and ignore them. And they often become less noticable over months to years. Only rarely do benign eye floaters become bothersome enough to consider treatment.

Foods That Can Help:

Garlic, beets, parsley, carrots, apple, parsnip, celery, raspberries (not too much fruit).

Glaucoma:

Glaucoma is a very common eye disorder affecting millions of Americans. It is caused by too much pressure on the inside of the eye. The fluid in your eyes helps to nourish and cleanse the inside of your eyes by constantly flowing in and out.

When the fluid is prevented from flowing out, the intraocular pressure builds and damages the optic nerve. This causes a gradual loss in peripheral vision.

Symptoms
Those suffering from open-angle glaucoma experience a type of tunnel vision, where their field of vision gradually decreases. It can eventually lead to blindness.

Narrow-angle glaucoma, which is rare, carries symptoms of sharp pain in the eyes, blurred vision, dilated pupils, and even nausea or vomiting. It can cause blindness in a matter of days, and it requires immediate medical attention.

Risk Factors
Heredity seems to be a risk factor. Also, you may be at greater risk if you are over 45, of African descent, near-sighted, or diabetic.

Finally, if you have used steroids or cortizone for a long period of time, or if you have suffered an eye injury in the past, you have a greater chance of developing glaucoma.

Foods That Can Help:

Celery, cucumber, carrots, radish, parsley, turnip, beets, raspberries, cabbage, apple, plums (not too much fruit).

Lattice Degeneration:

Lattice degeneration is a common clinical entity which has many morphologies. It is defined to have one or more of the following features organized in accordance to their presumed frequency of occurrence: localized round, oval or linear shaped retinal thinning; pigmentation; whitish-yellow surface flecks; round, oval or linear white patches; round, oval or linear red craters; small atrophic round holes; branching white lines; yellow atrophic spots (depigmentation of pigment epithelium); and rarely tractional tears at the ends or posterior margins of lesions.

Usually one, but sometimes two or more of these features predominate in each individual lesion.

The observation of lesions in the peripheral retina suggestive of lattice must be carefully examined with scleral indentation and indirect ophthalmoscopy. The borders of lattice lesions will have an abrupt, discrete edge adjacent to otherwise normal retina.

Foods That Can Help:

Ginger, leeks, garlic, parsley, cabbage, beets, carrots, spinach, apples, celery, grapes, lemon, raspberries, wheat grasses, chlorophyll - (not too much fruit).

Macular Degeneration:

Macular degeneration is a disease which affects a small area of the retina known as the macula. The macula is a specialized spot on the retina that allows us to see the fine detail of whatever is directly in front of us. Macular degeneration occurs when the macula begins to deteriorate.

“Wet” vs. “Dry”
Most often, macular degeneration is accompanied by formation of yellow deposits, called “drusen,” under the macula, which dry out or thin the macula.

This is called “dry” macular degeneration. In rare cases, abnormal blood vessels develop under the macula and leak fluid. This is called “wet” macular degeneration.

Causes
A number of uncontrollable factors contribute to macular degeneration, including age, sex, eye color, farsightedness, and race. Risk factors you can control include smoking, high blood pressure, exposure to harmful sunlight, and diet.

Symptoms
It is difficult to detect dry macular degeneration in its early stages. The most common symptoms, when detected, include a spot of blurry vision, dark vision, or distorted vision. Wet macular degeneration progresses much faster than the dry variety. Both forms of macular degeneration can cause blindness.

Foods That Can Help:

Broccoli, green and red bell pepper, raspberries, apples, leafy greens.

Optic Nerve: Optic Nerve Atropy:

The optic nerve contains over one million nerves that connect the retina (back of the eye) with the occipital lobe (vision part of the brain) like a cable wire.

What is optic nerve atrophy?

Optic nerve atrophy (ONA) is mild to severe damage to the optic nerve that can adversely affect central vision, peripheral vision and color vision. ONA that occurs as a child may result in nystagmus (rhythmic involuntary eye movements) [See figures 1 and 2].

What causes optic nerve atrophy?

ONA causes include: tumor, trauma, decreased blood supply (ischemia) or oxygen supply (hypoxia), heredity, hydrocephalus, toxins, infection, and rare degenerative disorders. Onset can be from birth through adulthood.

Foods That Can Help:

Ginger, beets, parsley, cabbage, endive, carrots, wheat grasses, chlorophyll, berries.

Retinitis Pigmentosis:

Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited, degenerative eye disease that causes severe vision impairment due to the progressive degeneration of the rod photoreceptor cells in the retina.

This form of retinal dystrophy manifests initial symptoms independent of age; thus, RP diagnosis occurs anywhere from early infancy to late adulthood Patients in the early stages of RP first notice compromised peripheral and dim light vision due to the decline of the rod photoreceptors.

The progressive rod degeneration is later followed by abnormalities in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the deterioration of cone photoreceptor cells. As peripheral vision becomes increasingly compromised, patients experience progressive "tunnel vision" and eventual blindness.

Affected individuals may additionally experience defective light-dark adaptations, nyctalopia (night blindness), and the accumulation of bone spicules in the fundus (eye).

Foods That Can Help:

Ginger, leeks, garlic, parsley, cabbage, beets, carrots, celery, apples, spinach, grapes, lemon, chlorophyll, raspberries, wheat grasses (not too much fruit).

So, all you need to do is : find out the suitable combo for you and then juice it.

"Table Showing Different Eye Diseases & Foods That Can Help"

Eye Diseases

Foods That Can Help

Best's Disease

Ginger, leeks, garlic, beets, parsley, carrots, cabbage, celery, apples, spinach, raspberries, grapes, lemon, wheat grasses chlorophyll

Cataracts and Conjunctivitis

Carrot, celery, spinach, endive, blueberry, parsley, apple

Diabetic Retinopathy

Ginger, asparagus, garlic, leeks, jerusalem artichokes, spinach, parsley, beets, pumpkin, celery, carrots, cabbage, raspberries chlorophyll.

Eye Floaters

Garlic, beets, parsley, carrots, apple, parsnip, celery, raspberries

Glaucoma

Celery, cucumber, carrots, radish, parsley, turnip, beets, raspberries, cabbage, apple, plums

Lattice Degeneration

Ginger, leeks, garlic, parsley, cabbage, beets, carrots, spinach, apples, celery, grapes, lemon, raspberries, wheat grasses, chlorophyll

Macular Degeneration

Broccoli, green and red bell pepper, raspberries, apples, leafy greens

Optic Nerve Atropy

Ginger, beets, parsley, cabbage, endive, carrots, wheat grasses, chlorophyll, berries

Retinitis Pigmentosis

Ginger, leeks, garlic, parsley, cabbage, beets, carrots, celery, apples, spinach, grapes, lemon, chlorophyll, raspberries, wheat grasses

More Useful Tips for Healthy Eyes and Vision:

Eat More Berries:

Berries are real super foods, they are rich in nutrients and fiber and are full of antioxidants. Certain types of berries such as bilberries and Goji berries can also improve your vision.

If you have a problem with your eyes, such as blurred vision or inability to focus, then bilberries can help. They improve the circulation to the ocular area and enhance the pigmented area of the eyes.

People who have eyesight problems may experience improvement of their eyesight problems when consuming Goji berries. This is
because of the high beta-carotene content in these berries

Herbs That Can Protect Your Eyes:

    • Rosemary – A common herb used in cooking, rosemary contains powerful antioxidants that may help retard the growth of cataracts. Take rosemary as a tea, mixing with lemon balm. Drink at least one cup of hot tea per day.
    • Turmeric – Turmeric has a high concentration of antioxidants, especially the top three known to help prevent cataracts, vitamins A, C and E.

Tips for Healthy Eyes and Vision:

Start with good eating habits as early in life as possible. If you consume a balanced diet already in your teens, it’s less likely you will develop chronic diseases – and many of these are connected to eye problems – later in life. The same goes for your children and their eating habits.

Eat healthy oils, such as coconut oil and olive oil, as some vitamins and antioxidants are fat soluble, so fatty acids need to be present for the body to absorb them.

Take frequent breaks when you work behind the computer to give your eyes the much needed eyes. The eyes will greatly benefit from a 5 minute respite after an hour of staring at the computer screen. Just look out for a while. Or,shut your eyes and let them relax.


Sources:

http://www.healthyandnaturalworld.com/how-to-naturally-improve-your-eyesight-with-juicing/

http://www.healthambition.com/juicing-improve-your-eyesight-naturally/

http://fitlife.tv/want-to-have-better-eye-sight-consider-these-3-things-saturday-strategy/

http://www.naturaleyecare.com/eye-disease-prevention/juicing-food-for-your-eyes.asp

http://www.allaboutvision.com/teens/nutrition.htm

http://www.ackersonicare.com/eye-health/eye-diseases.html#Cataracts

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retinitis_pigmentosa

http://www.aapos.org/terms/conditions/81

http://eyewiki.aao.org/Best_Disease

http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/benign-eye-floaters

https://juicerecipes.com/health/benefits/juicing-to-improve-eyesight/


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